The Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2020

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Consultation has concluded

With predictions of more people coming to live in Wellington City in the future, we need to find better ways to manage and reduce our waste.


What happened with this project

The Proposed Bylaw was open for public consultation from 4 August to 25 September 2020, and 166 submissions were received.

In November 2020 the Council decided to adopt the proposed Bylaw (subject to some minor amendments).


New Bylaw and Controls (effective 25 January 2021)

Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2020
This bylaw replaces Part 9 (Waste Management) of the Wellington City Council Consolidated Bylaw 2008.

Controls for the Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2020
In accordance with the bylaw, addition controls apply in relation to solid waste management, collection and disposal and the use of the Southern Landfill.


Background to the Waste Bylaw review

In 2017 the eight councils of the Wellington Region agreed to investigate, and if feasible develop, a regionally consistent waste bylaw. Following this, the councils reviewed their existing bylaws and worked together to develop a suite of bylaw provisions that would facilitate the better management of waste. The Proposed Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw was the outcome of this work.

The Proposed Bylaw introduced a suite of new waste management standards, including changes that looked at:

1. standards to manage waste and kerbside collection;

2. restrictions on the distribution of unaddressed and advertising mail;

3. event waste management planning requirements for large events;

4. construction and demolition waste planning requirements for high-value building projects; and

5. standards to ensure that new multi-unit dwellings, with 10 or more residential units, have adequate provision for waste and recycling generated on-site.

With predictions of more people coming to live in Wellington City in the future, we need to find better ways to manage and reduce our waste.


What happened with this project

The Proposed Bylaw was open for public consultation from 4 August to 25 September 2020, and 166 submissions were received.

In November 2020 the Council decided to adopt the proposed Bylaw (subject to some minor amendments).


New Bylaw and Controls (effective 25 January 2021)

Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2020
This bylaw replaces Part 9 (Waste Management) of the Wellington City Council Consolidated Bylaw 2008.

Controls for the Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw 2020
In accordance with the bylaw, addition controls apply in relation to solid waste management, collection and disposal and the use of the Southern Landfill.


Background to the Waste Bylaw review

In 2017 the eight councils of the Wellington Region agreed to investigate, and if feasible develop, a regionally consistent waste bylaw. Following this, the councils reviewed their existing bylaws and worked together to develop a suite of bylaw provisions that would facilitate the better management of waste. The Proposed Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw was the outcome of this work.

The Proposed Bylaw introduced a suite of new waste management standards, including changes that looked at:

1. standards to manage waste and kerbside collection;

2. restrictions on the distribution of unaddressed and advertising mail;

3. event waste management planning requirements for large events;

4. construction and demolition waste planning requirements for high-value building projects; and

5. standards to ensure that new multi-unit dwellings, with 10 or more residential units, have adequate provision for waste and recycling generated on-site.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Thank you for all of your questions on the proposal. 

You may also want to check the list of FAQs and documents on the right hand side of this web page. 

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    Are you limiting the amount of green waste that can be deposited in the general waste collection?

    Irene Studman asked about 1 year ago

    Thank you for your enquiry.  Yes, the proposed Bylaw controls stipulate that no more than 10% green waste shall be deposited into any Council provided waste receptacle. 

    As context, our existing Waste Management bylaw standards currently in place do not allow for any green waste to be placed in a Council waste receptacle.  As such, the proposed standards provide a more flexible approach for Council waste service users.  

    Where a person has a larger amount of green waste they wish to dispose of, they can either take it directly to the Southern Landfill site and dispose of it as green waste for the purpose of composting (which currently cost less than half the price of waste disposal), or hire a green waste bin from a private waste operator.

    Thank you,

    Emma Richardson

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    Has there been any thought given to working with New Zealand based product producers to offer alternative packaging? Such as milk being offered in glass instead of plastic for a small additional price. Or working with local supermarkets to reduce plastic, and to offer alternatives that produce less waste. Possibly applying levies where alternatives are not being offered, or incentives of some sort where they are offering alternatives. Also what thoughts are going in to Wellington being able to do something with its own recycling (not landfill), for plastics 3, 4, 6 and 7. Im not sure the answer is about changing consumer habits, its about product producers not using these types of plastics that are not able to be recycled effectively, and also offering consumers alternatives that are not cost prohibitive. Is it possible to tax companies that continue to use this sort of packaging?

    Kirsty asked about 1 year ago


    Thank you for your questions.  

    Within your questions you raise many relevant points that are outside of the scope of the current bylaw review, and instead need to be considered at a Central Government and industry level. For example, consideration of taxation on packaging and producers, regulating product producers to restrict single use plastics, the establishment of levies and financial incentives to reduce waste, and the production packaging solutions that produce less waste are matters that would need to be advanced by Central Government, with such matters not being a function of the Council.  

    However, Wellington City Council does actively promote waste minimisation through working with schools and community groups.   For example, over the last few years the Council has worked with other Councils to promote the Love Food Hate Waste Campaign, which has involved campaign promotion at local supermarkets.

    More broadly, the Council has an obligation to promote effective and efficient waste management and minimisation, and the Proposed Solid Waste Management and Minimisation Bylaw exists as a one way for the Council to do this.  

    Thank you.

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    What about kerbside composting ? This will massively reduce our waste outputs and stop unnecessary harmful gases reaching landfill in the first place. Even just the option to have it collected would make a huge difference

    Caitlin Pilcher asked about 1 year ago

    Thank you for your question: ‘What about kerbside composting’?  

    The Council has recently proposed a 1-year food waste diversion trial on the Miramar Peninsula.  This trial will encompass 450 households to try composting their food waste in either a compost bin, worm farm, or a bokashi system. This trial will coincide with a kerbside collection of binned food scraps from 500 households in the area.   

    The results and feedback of this trial will be used to further inform the Council’s next steps relating to the promotion or regulation of food waste diversion within the City.

    Should a Council provided food waste collection service become available in the future, the proposed bylaw would readily allow the Council to specify any additional operational performance standards necessary for the implementation of a new food waste kerbside collection service.

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    Can you confirm that this proposed by law is consistent regionally and all councils will be consulting on it at this time. Or will there be differences in time and content depending on the council?

    Mike Oates asked about 1 year ago

    Thanks for your question.   As they are individual Council bylaws, there will be some differences between them, but many of the provisions will also be regionally consistent.  The WCC bylaw is also unique because of the bylaw controls being proposed.  

    Wellington City Council and Hutt City Council have publicly notified their bylaws at the same time, and both Councils are running an extended 8 week consultation period.   Other Councils will have varying consultation dates.  You will need to refer to each respective Council for their consultation date details.