Representation Review 2021

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Have your say on how you’re represented at a local level.

The 2021 Representation Review looks at governance arrangements for Wellington City in the next local election.

As Wellington changes it is important that the make-up of our electoral boundaries still ensure fair and effective representation of the communities that live here. To successfully do this we need to regularly check in with Wellingtonians through a representation review.

A representation review will look at the number of councillors there should be in a district or region and the way they are elected. It could change the number of councillors we elect, the number of wards, the local electoral boundaries, or our number of community boards.

Under the Electoral Act 2001 we are required to review our elected representation at least every six years. Wellington City Council last did this in 2018 however in 2021 Council agreed to introduce a Māori Ward which means we need to review our representation boundaries and check in with our communities again.

The dates for representation reviews are set by legislation and so we need to start public submissions now while we are still in lockdown.

The outcome of this year’s review will apply to the 2022 local election. Council may conduct another review ahead of the 2025 election.

What's been considered

The Council has come up with some options which are outlined in the representation review consultation document. From these, a preferred option for Wellington has been chosen by Councillors and we want to hear what you think.

After considering all the options, Council is recommending that the current ward structure is kept in place with no changes and the new Māori ward councillor is added.

We are proposing to keep our current community board structure with Tawa Community Board and Makara/Ohariu Community Board. We are also proposing to update the name of the Makara/Ohariu Community Board to have the right macrons – Mākara/Ōhāriu Community Board.

This means the proposal is to have fifteen councillors in total: 14 general ward councillors elected from five wards, one Māori ward councillor elected from one ward over the whole city, and a mayor elected by the whole city. Wellington City Council is currently represented by 14 councillors and a mayor.

Regardless of the number of councillors we have, the total amount available to pay elected members remains the same; the money is split between the number of councillors there are.

How to share your views

The Council has come up with some options which are outlined in the representation review consultation document. From these, a preferred option for Wellington has been chosen but we want to know what you think. Do you agree with the preferred option?

You can access and read the full consultation document from this page.

If you have any questions, ask them via the “Ask a question’ button and we’ll reply to you within two working days.

Share your views either online or by mailing in your submission form to Deputy Electoral Officer, PO Box 2199, Wellington 6140

The consultation period has now closed and we are summarising the responses.

Have your say on how you’re represented at a local level.

The 2021 Representation Review looks at governance arrangements for Wellington City in the next local election.

As Wellington changes it is important that the make-up of our electoral boundaries still ensure fair and effective representation of the communities that live here. To successfully do this we need to regularly check in with Wellingtonians through a representation review.

A representation review will look at the number of councillors there should be in a district or region and the way they are elected. It could change the number of councillors we elect, the number of wards, the local electoral boundaries, or our number of community boards.

Under the Electoral Act 2001 we are required to review our elected representation at least every six years. Wellington City Council last did this in 2018 however in 2021 Council agreed to introduce a Māori Ward which means we need to review our representation boundaries and check in with our communities again.

The dates for representation reviews are set by legislation and so we need to start public submissions now while we are still in lockdown.

The outcome of this year’s review will apply to the 2022 local election. Council may conduct another review ahead of the 2025 election.

What's been considered

The Council has come up with some options which are outlined in the representation review consultation document. From these, a preferred option for Wellington has been chosen by Councillors and we want to hear what you think.

After considering all the options, Council is recommending that the current ward structure is kept in place with no changes and the new Māori ward councillor is added.

We are proposing to keep our current community board structure with Tawa Community Board and Makara/Ohariu Community Board. We are also proposing to update the name of the Makara/Ohariu Community Board to have the right macrons – Mākara/Ōhāriu Community Board.

This means the proposal is to have fifteen councillors in total: 14 general ward councillors elected from five wards, one Māori ward councillor elected from one ward over the whole city, and a mayor elected by the whole city. Wellington City Council is currently represented by 14 councillors and a mayor.

Regardless of the number of councillors we have, the total amount available to pay elected members remains the same; the money is split between the number of councillors there are.

How to share your views

The Council has come up with some options which are outlined in the representation review consultation document. From these, a preferred option for Wellington has been chosen but we want to know what you think. Do you agree with the preferred option?

You can access and read the full consultation document from this page.

If you have any questions, ask them via the “Ask a question’ button and we’ll reply to you within two working days.

Share your views either online or by mailing in your submission form to Deputy Electoral Officer, PO Box 2199, Wellington 6140

The consultation period has now closed and we are summarising the responses.

Ask a question

Please enter your question about the Representation Review using the box below. We monitor the site from 8:30am - 5pm Monday to Friday and aim to respond within 48 hours

You may also want to check the list of FAQs on the right-hand side of this web page. 

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    I take it that to be eligible to vote in the Maori ward, a person will have to be on the Maori Electoral Roll, and therefore unable to vote in his/her general ward. What will be the cut-off date for a person to elect to go onto or off the Maori roll prior to the next council elections?

    David S asked about 1 month ago

    Correct, every voter on the Māori Electoral Roll will vote in the Māori ward instead of a general ward. Those already enrolled have the opportunity to change rolls after each census, every five to six years. If you are of Māori descent and not yet enrolled, you can enrol on the Māori Electoral Roll at any time up to the day before the next local election and vote (7 October 2022 is the last day you can enrol). 

    The Government recently consulted on changes to this process: https://www.justice.govt.nz/justice-sector-policy/key-initiatives/maori-electoral-option/

    For completeness, it should be noted that Council has already made the decision to establish a Māori ward and this cannot be changed as part of the representation review. 

Page last updated: 05 October 2021, 12:17