Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2021

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Consultation has concluded

The new Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2021 was unanimously adopted by Wellington City Council on 26 August 2021 and came into effect on 27 August 2021.

Thank you to everyone who gave us feedback, which will help us determine how best to protect, promote and maintain public safety on roads or parking areas owned or managed by the Council.

Over 400 people gave feedback. Many submitters commented on whether motorcycles should be able to park in car-sized parking spaces, while around 150 people shared their personal experiences of engine braking noise or cruising activity disturbance.

Lots of submitters also took the opportunity to suggest alternatives to parking on footpaths. The Council recently revoked a parking on footpath enforcement guideline from 2005 to better reflect current legislation and the new Parking Policy. In the coming months the Council will work with key stakeholders including resident associations to implement solutions over time. Meanwhile, no changes to current ticketing practice will be made and parking officers will continue to use their powers of discretion under the Land Transport Act 1998.


The new Traffic and Parking Bylaw 2021 was unanimously adopted by Wellington City Council on 26 August 2021 and came into effect on 27 August 2021.

Thank you to everyone who gave us feedback, which will help us determine how best to protect, promote and maintain public safety on roads or parking areas owned or managed by the Council.

Over 400 people gave feedback. Many submitters commented on whether motorcycles should be able to park in car-sized parking spaces, while around 150 people shared their personal experiences of engine braking noise or cruising activity disturbance.

Lots of submitters also took the opportunity to suggest alternatives to parking on footpaths. The Council recently revoked a parking on footpath enforcement guideline from 2005 to better reflect current legislation and the new Parking Policy. In the coming months the Council will work with key stakeholders including resident associations to implement solutions over time. Meanwhile, no changes to current ticketing practice will be made and parking officers will continue to use their powers of discretion under the Land Transport Act 1998.


Consultation has concluded
  • Summary of proposed bylaw changes

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    The Council has proposed changing the current traffic bylaw to:

    • revoke Part 7: Traffic from the Consolidated Bylaw 2008, then create a new bylaw called the Traffic and Parking Bylaw, carrying over some of the provisions from the current Part 7, repealing some and amending others
    • add cross-references to the Parking Policy 2020 and Council guidelines where relevant and confirm the Chief Executive of the Council is responsible for the approval of the guidelines
    • remove any unnecessary duplication to national legislation, including duplicated definitions
    • clarify the scope includes all Council-managed places
    • provide for managing safe and efficient movement of traffic
    • provide for shared paths, shared use parking zones and special vehicle lanes
    • reflect the Parking Policy 2020 (assume these are the same as noted elsewhere but I’m keen to re-word them if possible so they all begin with an active verb)
      • setting parking charges and restrictions by zone as well as by designated space
      • payment according to vehicle licence plate as well as by parking space
      • charging and restricting by vehicle type and space use
      • introducing parking restriction zones to prevent the parking of oversize and non-motorised vehicles on the street in certain areas
      • an offence to park over or across more than once marked parking space
      • the implementation of new restricted parking zones with residents’ exemption permits
      • new types of parking permits and removal of coupon exemption permits.
      • provide for demand responsive pricing
      • provide for restricted parking areas based on vehicle type
    • enable temporary road changes for pilot/trial schemes
    • make it simpler for Parking Officers to remove non-motorised vehicles that park on the street for longer than 7 days
    • regulate the parking of vehicles for advertising or selling purposes
    • manage mobile trading in roads and public places (prohibit or permit and charge for)
    • prohibit the driving, riding or parking of vehicles on beaches
    • restrict the driving, riding or parking of vehicles on unformed legal roads
    • amend definition of taxi to include small passenger service vehicles (SPSVs)
    • clarify that skip/bulk bins can be restricted, charged and removed when in contravention of the traffic bylaw using bylaw making powers under the LGA
    • clarify the conditions for using public works as a defence for parking offences.
    • amend the current traffic bylaw to allow motorcycles to park in standard-sized metered parking bays, subject to the payment of the correct fee
    • add a provision to prohibit or restrict engine braking in certain areas
    • add a provision to control, restrict or prohibit cruising activity and disturbance.
  • What is a traffic and parking bylaw?

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    A traffic bylaw is used to regulate a wide range of activities that take place on road reserve and parking areas within Wellington City. This is to protect, promote and maintain public health and safety and protect the public from nuisance and to minimise the potential for offensive behaviour preventing the wellbeing and enjoyment of the public using the road network and parking areas in the City.

    The traffic bylaw sets the requirements for parking and the movement of traffic on any road or parking area owned or managed by Wellington City Council.



  • Parking Vehicles on Footpaths

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    The Council regularly receives complaints about vehicles parking on footpaths. It was also raised by several submitters to the Parking Policy review, including Living Streets Aotearoa, Mt Victoria Residents Association and Creswick Valley Residents Association.

    Under the Land Transport (Road User) Rule 2004, a driver or person in charge of a vehicle must not stop, stand or park the vehicle on a footpath. Parking on footpaths is an offence.

    At a Council meeting on 22 September 2005 the Strategy and Policy Committee agreed to guidelines to specifically target no footpath parking in the central area and suburban centres (as defined by the District Plan) and agreed that outside of these two areas, a ‘reasonable footpath space’ must be available for pedestrian thoroughfare. The enforcement practice was to allow one metre. The Committee also agreed to no footpath parking by trucks or other large vehicles.

    It has been more than 15 years since this guideline was agreed. Parking demand and car ownership rates have increased, leading to more vehicles parked on the street. There are new types of users of footpaths, such as e-scooters and other types of micro-mobility, that is adding to footpath congestion in some places. This in turn is causing more accessibility challenges and risks for footpath users. However, when vehicles park on one or both sides of some of Wellington's narrow, winding streets emergency and service vehicles are unable to get through.

    In order to reduce public confusion about the legality of parking on footpaths and improve safety and accessibility for pedestrians and other footpath users the Council agreed to revoke the agreement to part 2(b) of the September 2005 guideline.

    This means Parking Officers can apply judgement and some level of discretion on all cases of footpath parking outside the central city and suburban centres, prioritising the safe movement of people on footpaths over the parking of vehicles on the street.

    On narrow streets where emergency vehicles and access by service and delivery vehicles is compromised the Council could consider:

    • installing broken yellow lines to stop people parking on one or both sides of the road
    • installing signs reminding drivers it is an offence to park on the footpath
    • making some parts of a street one-way or prioritise one-way traffic movement
    • removing footpaths that do not provide access to properties or other services where there is adequate and suitable footpaths on the opposite side of the road
    • adding new parking management, such as time restrictions or designated parking, in nearby locations to ensure residents and their visitors can access properties.

    These measures may result in residents not being able to park in the road immediately outside their homes and will increase costs to Council to install and maintain the new traffic management devices. Therefore, the Council are seeking your ideas of how the impacts of the change in enforcement practice could be best managed on streets where parking vehicles on the footpath was commonplace.