Smarter Ways to Manage Parking

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Ngā Ara Kokoi hei Whakahaere Papawaka

Consultation on the draft Parking Policy closed at 5pm, 8 June 2020.

Thank you for your interest and to those who entered a submission, joined our webinars, commented on our social media posts, participated in our quick polls or spoke to us in person.

Your views and suggestions are valuable to us and will help form the final proposal to Council. All the feedback we have received will be provided to Councillors for their review before they deliberate the final proposal in August.

We received 441 submissions via the online form, plus 93 additional submissions by email and 6 submissions by post, hundreds of comments on our Facebook posts and responses to our quick polls. 51 people made an oral submission, 23 on behalf of a group or an organisation and the remainder as an individual. A more detailed breakdown of all submissions received will be provided in a summary report.



Ngā Ara Kokoi hei Whakahaere Papawaka

Consultation on the draft Parking Policy closed at 5pm, 8 June 2020.

Thank you for your interest and to those who entered a submission, joined our webinars, commented on our social media posts, participated in our quick polls or spoke to us in person.

Your views and suggestions are valuable to us and will help form the final proposal to Council. All the feedback we have received will be provided to Councillors for their review before they deliberate the final proposal in August.

We received 441 submissions via the online form, plus 93 additional submissions by email and 6 submissions by post, hundreds of comments on our Facebook posts and responses to our quick polls. 51 people made an oral submission, 23 on behalf of a group or an organisation and the remainder as an individual. A more detailed breakdown of all submissions received will be provided in a summary report.



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  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    On page 10..why is there no reference to the recent change and increase of buildings without car parks. And again there is no reference to the bus issues that are creating par and ride suburbs?

    M asked about 1 month ago

    The Statement of Proposal is the draft policy. For more information on the evidence and analysis that informed the proposal please refer to the Background Report and the Discussion Document (links under the Useful Documents section). Both these documents refer to the role of the District Plan in influencing the supply of parking and the parking pressures caused by park and ride behaviour. 

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    BACKGROUND TO THE QUESTION: I wish to emphasise the changing circumstances for students thereby transport adding unneeded stress. the price of rental properties close to CBD are increasing dramatically causing students to live further out of the CBD. From comments I've heard while at university busses still fail us students. Some buses being so congested (we walk all the way to a bus stop) only to be turned down thereby missing class. More and more, students are having to buy/maintain cars and drive to university and work because: 1. busses can often be too congested to allow people on in the mornings . 2. buses can be un-trustworthy to get us to class on time . 3. CBD rent is increasing causing students to live much further from uni. 4. there is no campus university parking available like most NZ universities have nor is there free bus fares for students which is common around the world and at some universities in NZ. 5. Walking can take hours when living far from uni + biking can seem dangerous / hills / wind / late afternoon classes (dark). 6. $4.50 an hour to park near university (Aro campus / Pipitea campus) is extremely hard for students that aren't able to successfully bus/walk/train to their classes. 7. it is common for students today to work 10-20hrs a week on top of full time study - in order to afford Wellington living. Having to worry about busses not showing up/congestion and inability to walk to work necessitates using a car. 8. all of this can result in students neglecting studies because of the difficulty of transport and high price of parking. These scenarios are not the majority of students, however the amount of students in this situation I believe is rising rapidly. I ask, how (if at all) is WC Council considering students (at least 20,000 of us) of Wellington in the parking scheme?

    Vivian M asked about 1 month ago

    We appreciate the difficulties faced by students on low or no income living in an expensive city such as Wellington. 

    Wellington City Council does not manage the public transport network (this is managed by Greater Wellington Council). However, please refer to my previous response about the projects the City Council is collaborating on to improve bus reliability and active transport options.

    The draft parking policy proposes a framework for managing parking in Wellington, it does not propose any specific changes to any street or area in the city but will be used to guide future decision-making. Therefore, there are no immediate changes to parking management around Kelburn and the university. The parking policy will be implemented over the next ten years. 

    Currently, car ownership levels and the number of vehicles entering and moving around the city exceeds the capacity of our streets to accommodate them all and allow everyone to park where they want to. The parking policy is proposing a hierarchy to prioritise where and which type of parking the Council is able to provide. In Kelburn, an inner city/city fringe area, the proximity to the central area, the university, key tourist attractions, heritage residential properties, key bus routes to/from Karori and a suburban town centre mean that many, many people are all trying to use the streets for different reasons. The Council just cannot provide parking for everyone, keep the pavements safe for pedestrians, the roads safe and provide sufficient space for cycleways and to improve the efficiency and reliability of bus transport. Therefore, we want to encourage and support a change to active and public transport, a reduction in car ownership, a move to car share and rideshare, and a shift to using privately provided off-street parking when required and use the valuable on-street space for those circumstances when public or active transport are not suitable alternatives.  

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    in your answer below you state that 'making removing on-street parking and making a street space more usable and attractive for pedestrians, cyclists and outdoor areas for businesses results in an increase in consumer spending' So then when will you make the Central city and other suburban shopping areas more pedestrian /cycle friendly by limiting / removing private vehicles or reducing on street parking so there is room for cycle lanes.

    Jill asked about 1 month ago

    Let’s Get Wellington Moving is a joint initiative between Wellington City Council, Greater Wellington Regional Council, and Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency. The focus is the area from Ngauranga Gorge to Miramar including the Wellington Urban Motorway, access to the port, and connections to the central city, Wellington Hospital, and the airport. It includes all the ways we get to and around our city, and how the city develops alongside its transport system.

    A current project is the improvements to the Golden Mile (Lambton Quay to Courtenay Place) to make it better for people walking and on bikes, and give buses more priority. Last year the public were asked for feedback on how to improve the Golden Mile. The feedback can be viewed here: https://lgwm.nz/our-plan/our-projects/golden-mile/ 

    The next stage of the project is to consult on options for the improvements. This is expected this year. 

    In the meantime. Wellington City Council successfully applied for funding from Waka Kotahi NZ Transport Agency for some temporary street changes to make people feel safer walking and cycling in the city called Innovating Streets.  The Council consulted on some of these changes through the traffic resolution process last month and decisions will be made on the final projects soon. Two of the proposed projects are open for feedback through the traffic resolution process now - the notification closes for comments 11 June 2020 - go to the link below to learn more and share your views:

    https://wellington.govt.nz/have-your-say/public-inputs/consultations/open/proposed-traffic-resolutions---covid-19-projects-on-featherston-victoria-and-hunter-streets 

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    With the desire to increase the number of people using public transport, will there be an introduction of more routes/services that were previously removed? For example i used to get a bus from one of the northern suburbs to the hospital directly. This was removed in the last big shake up of services, now i am required to get 2 buses to get to the same location, taking longer which therefore means i am better off using the car. Bringing back some of those routes, by reducing the increases that have occurred on other routes may encourage people back onto public transport.

    BenNZ asked about 1 month ago

    Greater Wellington Regional Council manage the Metlink public transport network including the bus routes and schedules. Last year, Greater Wellington and Metlink ran a public review of the bus network changes and the outcomes of this are expected soon. Please refer to their website for more information ://haveyoursay.gw.govt.nz/busreview 

    Wellington City Council collaborated with Greater Wellington Regional Council last year on an investigative project to identify the key routes, issues and opportunities to improve the reliability of buses on Wellington’s busiest routes. The improvements will form part of the Let's Get Wellington Moving programme. You can read the draft action plan here:

    https://wellington.govt.nz/~/media/services/parking-and-roads/bus-priority/files/wellington-bus-priority-action-plan-draft.pdf?la=en 

    Feedback on public transport captured through this consultation will be shared with Greater Wellington Regional Council, Metlink and the Let's Get Wellington Moving team.

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    Hello, to support local retailers specially at wellington city area, can you please bring back the free weekend parking or holiday parking to encourage people to come to city? maybe up to 2 to 4 hours? right now, we lived at upper hutt now, if we are going to have a shop at the city, we are discouraged by the parking fee. we might as well go to lower hutt or porirua mall who has free parking. Thank you.

    TheGoodBoy asked about 2 months ago

    Thank you for your question – free parking sounds appealing, but the reality is quite different. When parking is free people tend to stay in the space for longer – even with time restrictions in place. This means there is a lower turnover of available spaces and less parking spaces available for everyone to use.

    As the Council only manages approximately 14% of all parking in the central city, mostly on-street we have to prioritise this to ensure access for deliveries (loading zones), pick up/drop off (P10/P15s), mobility parking, taxi stands, bus stops, car share and EV charging spaces and the short-stay parking that shoppers use. Free on-street parking means that fewer people can use the space each day to access shops and cafes etc. When the Council introduced weekend parking charges there was no change in retail spend. 

    Also when there is a low turnover of car parks, with low rates of empty spaces, we tend to get local congestion as cars drive around for longer searching for that free on-street park. Examples overseas and recent changes made to central city streets in Auckland has shown that be removing on-street parking and making a street space more usable and attractive for pedestrians, cyclists and outdoor areas for businesses results in an increase in consumer spending. When Fort Street was changed in to a shared street space, hospitality spending increased by 429%, consumer spending by 47% and pedestrian numbers by 50%. 

    Given the changes in travel and shopping behaviour as a result of Covid-19, the commercial operators of off-street parking buildings will have been hit hard too so they will be offering short-term discounts and incentives to attract shoppers and visitors back in to town to use their parking facilities.  

    We do acknowledge that each city is different in how the parking supply and demand works and it can result in those situations which you have highlighted.

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    Hi, how will the 85% demand be measured on suburban parking spaces to determine whether parking charges need to be introduced? What are charges likely to be? Can you also please confirm Tawa comes under the suburban areas. Thanks

    Anna Scott asked about 2 months ago

    The Council undertakes annual parking surveys where the occupancy and turnover of parking spaces is monitored and measured over a week. These types of surveys would be carried out as part of the planning for any area-based parking management proposals. Where parking spaces have sensors in place, the Council is able to collect and analyse the occupancy and turnover data all day, every day.

    It is not possible to forecast what a new parking fee might be. Parking fees and charges are set through the annual plan process. Moving to a demand-based pricing approach would give the Council more flexibility to adjust parking fees to achieve the desired occupancy. The parking fees could also be different at different times of the day or days of the week to better reflect the demand.

    Tawa is an outer residential area with a suburban centre and some key transport routes. The proposed parking policy does not map the seven parking areas or designate streets. This would be introduced at the area based planning stage in discussion with the community and others.


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    Is there any scope for WCC to buy or regulate pricing in parking buildings. I used to park in them quite happily but their rates are now typically so exorbitant that I just doubt consider them an option, I'm sure other people are in the same boat.

    Brad asked about 2 months ago

    As a council, we do not have the authority to influence the parking price set by commercial providers. 

    Wellington City Council manages only approximately 14% of the total parking supply in the central city. Other parking providers include private publicly accessible free parking such as at supermarkets and retail stores, private publicly accessible paid parking such as the Wilsons, CarePark and Prime Parking facilities and restricted access parking such as residential parking and employee-only parking. 

    The Council can influence how parking is provided in new buildings through the rules and requirements in our District Plan. We have started the process of reviewing our District Plan through our Planning for Growth programme. You can find out more at www.planningforgrowth.wellington.govt.nz

    Buying or building a new parking building is expensive and does not support our commitment to becoming a carbon zero city by 2050. A decision of that scale would need to be made through our Long-term Plan process, when the Council seeks feedback from the public on what the priorities should be for the next 10 years and how much it will cost. The current Long-term Plan was adopted in 2018 and is due for a review in 2021. 

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    Can you please publish a screen-friendly version of the new policy? The 'booklet' PDF thing you have is rubbish to try to read--having to scroll vertically and horizontally. By making something so unfriendly, you force people to print it out....

    daviddepalma asked 4 months ago

    Kia ora, 

    Yes, we are in the process of adding an accessible version of the Statement of Proposal to the website shortly.

    Regards