Smarter ways to manage city parking

A photograph of a section of Courtenay Place, Wellington with a line of cars parked on the street.

Thank you for completing the questionnaire and providing feedback on Wellington’s parking issues. We’ll use what you have told us to help develop a new draft parking policy. You can click through the tabs below to find out more about the different ways we could manage the city's parking issues.

Our city is growing

Over the next 30 years, Wellington will be home to another 50,000-80,000 residents and many more workers will commute in from the wider region. To accommodate this growth, we need a more efficient transport system that makes better use of our limited road space. This means moving more people using fewer vehicles; more public transport use, walking and cycling and fewer people driving and parking in busy areas. We need to review how we allocate road space for parking to support this change.

Let's Get Wellington Moving

This programme will deliver a step change in public transport for the city, including a mass transit route between the railway station and the airport. To pave the way for our future transport system, we need to start creating space along some key transport corridors, this will mean removing on-street parking spaces in some places.

Climate change and parking management

Wellington has been a leader in the climate change area in the past. Now we are ready to move to the next step by being First to Zero. Te Atakura – First to Zero sets out an ambitious series of challenges for us to address to further reduce the city’s carbon emissions. Road transport emissions comprise approximately 37% of those emissions. How we manage parking can support many of the proposed emissions reduction initiatives such as prioritising road space for active and public transport modes, allocating more on-street parking spaces for car share vehicles, electric vehicle charging and pick up/drop off services. The price of parking can also be used to influence what vehicles people drive plus how often and where they drive.

People expect more of our central business district (CBD)

More and more people live in and around the CBD. Thousands of workers and visitors come to the CBD each day. They increasingly expect to be able to walk, shop, dine and spend time in an attractive and safe environment. They expect cafes on pavements, street trees, public spaces and a pleasant environment. We need to continue to deliver better streets to meet these expectations. To make room for these features we may need to change some of the on-street parking spaces.

What does this mean for the management of parking?

The Parking Policy and the Mobility Parking Policy provide the guiding principles for the management and supply of on-street and Wellington City Council-controlled off-street parking in Wellington City. It’s critical that how we think and make decisions around parking, and how we prioritise the use of our streets for parking, fits with the future transport system. This is why we are taking a fresh look at our parking policies.

Parking in Newtown

In June/July this year, we assessed the street parking use and capacity in the wider Newtown area. 5456

parking spaces and 95 streets were surveyed. Click here to see the results.

How you can help?

Everyone is affected by this policy from vehicle drivers, bus passengers, cyclists to pedestrians. It's important everyone has their opportunity to share their views. The next opportunity to share your views will be the consultation on a new draft policy. We expect this to start early next year.

This website sets out the issues we need to think about and what principles could inform how we manage the limited parking.

Note: Following the closure of the Civic Square car park under the Central Library in March 2019, there are 59 fewer off-street Council-owned and managed public parking spaces and four fewer on-street parking spaces. Four of these are mobility parking spaces (two off-street and two on-street).

Thank you for completing the questionnaire and providing feedback on Wellington’s parking issues. We’ll use what you have told us to help develop a new draft parking policy. You can click through the tabs below to find out more about the different ways we could manage the city's parking issues.

Our city is growing

Over the next 30 years, Wellington will be home to another 50,000-80,000 residents and many more workers will commute in from the wider region. To accommodate this growth, we need a more efficient transport system that makes better use of our limited road space. This means moving more people using fewer vehicles; more public transport use, walking and cycling and fewer people driving and parking in busy areas. We need to review how we allocate road space for parking to support this change.

Let's Get Wellington Moving

This programme will deliver a step change in public transport for the city, including a mass transit route between the railway station and the airport. To pave the way for our future transport system, we need to start creating space along some key transport corridors, this will mean removing on-street parking spaces in some places.

Climate change and parking management

Wellington has been a leader in the climate change area in the past. Now we are ready to move to the next step by being First to Zero. Te Atakura – First to Zero sets out an ambitious series of challenges for us to address to further reduce the city’s carbon emissions. Road transport emissions comprise approximately 37% of those emissions. How we manage parking can support many of the proposed emissions reduction initiatives such as prioritising road space for active and public transport modes, allocating more on-street parking spaces for car share vehicles, electric vehicle charging and pick up/drop off services. The price of parking can also be used to influence what vehicles people drive plus how often and where they drive.

People expect more of our central business district (CBD)

More and more people live in and around the CBD. Thousands of workers and visitors come to the CBD each day. They increasingly expect to be able to walk, shop, dine and spend time in an attractive and safe environment. They expect cafes on pavements, street trees, public spaces and a pleasant environment. We need to continue to deliver better streets to meet these expectations. To make room for these features we may need to change some of the on-street parking spaces.

What does this mean for the management of parking?

The Parking Policy and the Mobility Parking Policy provide the guiding principles for the management and supply of on-street and Wellington City Council-controlled off-street parking in Wellington City. It’s critical that how we think and make decisions around parking, and how we prioritise the use of our streets for parking, fits with the future transport system. This is why we are taking a fresh look at our parking policies.

Parking in Newtown

In June/July this year, we assessed the street parking use and capacity in the wider Newtown area. 5456

parking spaces and 95 streets were surveyed. Click here to see the results.

How you can help?

Everyone is affected by this policy from vehicle drivers, bus passengers, cyclists to pedestrians. It's important everyone has their opportunity to share their views. The next opportunity to share your views will be the consultation on a new draft policy. We expect this to start early next year.

This website sets out the issues we need to think about and what principles could inform how we manage the limited parking.

Note: Following the closure of the Civic Square car park under the Central Library in March 2019, there are 59 fewer off-street Council-owned and managed public parking spaces and four fewer on-street parking spaces. Four of these are mobility parking spaces (two off-street and two on-street).

Category parking costs   Show all

  • The hidden costs of parking

    8 months ago
    Taranaki street  wellington

    The parking fee is set at a level that we think will encourage the internationally accepted ideal of 85 percent occupancy. That means if we’ve got it right, 15 percent of the parking spaces should be available at any time. That fee does not compensate the city for a number of other costs related to providing parking – such as increased use of cars which has an impact on traffic congestion, more emissions affecting the environment and loss of space that could be used for other public uses such as wider footpaths, cycling or bus lanes, or outdoor dining space....

    The parking fee is set at a level that we think will encourage the internationally accepted ideal of 85 percent occupancy. That means if we’ve got it right, 15 percent of the parking spaces should be available at any time. That fee does not compensate the city for a number of other costs related to providing parking – such as increased use of cars which has an impact on traffic congestion, more emissions affecting the environment and loss of space that could be used for other public uses such as wider footpaths, cycling or bus lanes, or outdoor dining space.