Decision 4 - Funding for Te Atākura - First to Zero action plan (climate change)

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Consultation has concluded

Te Atakura – First to Zero is our response to the climate and ecological emergency we declared in 2019, but it is not yet funded.

What's the background to this decision?

Wellington City Council has joined hundreds of other cities around in the world in declaring a State of Climate and Ecological Emergency, accepting local and international scientific evidence that there remains about a decade to take urgent action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in order to avoid disastrous consequences.

Our ambitious target of being a net zero carbon city by 2050 means we have to reduce our emissions significantly in this decade (the national target is half by 2030). This is essential to ensuring Wellington is a place where human society can flourish in future decades and centuries.

The biggest change to our emissions will come when people get onto their feet, bikes or a bus - or into an electric car! Work on the cycleways network, how we design our city, and Let’s Get Wellington Moving’s plans are all part of that change. The full benefits of these won’t occur this decade.

Therefore, in addition to those big pieces of work, we propose to fully fund Council’s climate change action plan, which includes:

  • Converting our vehicle fleet to electric cars
  • Greening our building projects
  • Supporting car sharing and electric vehicle charging
  • Home Energy Saver grants
  • Business Energy Saver grants
  • Wellington Climate Lab
  • Climate and Sustainability Fund

There are three options

Option 1:
Low Level of Funding

Option 2:
Medium Investment with Savings

Option 3:
Fully Fund the programme (preferred)

This is a low funding option that is significantly below what is outlined in the Te Atākura action plan. It will mean a significant reduction in the scope of all planned initiatives.

The difference between this option and Option 2 is a significant reduction in outward facing programmes that support others to take climate action, lower levels of funding for community engagement and initiative development. This level of funding is likely to deliver only half of the reduction in estimated emissions of Option 3.

This is a medium level of funding, below what is outlined in the Te Atākura action plan. The difference between this option and Option 3 is:
  • less funding for the WCC electric vehicle (EV) Fleet
  • public EV chargers; and
  • lower levels of funding for community engagement and initiative development.
Lower levels of reductions in emissions are likely with this option.

This option provides full funding for the Te Atākura action plan (not including Let’s Get Wellington Moving or cycleways).

This means we will be able to work toward reducing our emissions by the full amount planned for this decade. We will also be able to investigate new actions needed and respond to the climate change impacts that we are already seeing in the city.


Capital cost and debt impact: $6.7m (over 10 years)
Same as Option 1
Capital cost and debt impact: $9.1m (over 10 years)
Rates change 0.65% 3 year average increase
Rates change: 0.94% 3 year average increase
Rates change: 1.03% 3 year average increase


These options have pros and cons, which are outlined in more detail here

Our preferred option

The Council prefers Option 3 - to fully fund Te Atakura. This will enable us to work towards reducing our emissions by the full amount planned for this decade.


Want to know more about another Decision? Head back to our Long-term Plan homepage or read our full consultation document

Or, are you ready to have your say? Head to our Long-term Plan online submission form

Te Atakura – First to Zero is our response to the climate and ecological emergency we declared in 2019, but it is not yet funded.

What's the background to this decision?

Wellington City Council has joined hundreds of other cities around in the world in declaring a State of Climate and Ecological Emergency, accepting local and international scientific evidence that there remains about a decade to take urgent action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in order to avoid disastrous consequences.

Our ambitious target of being a net zero carbon city by 2050 means we have to reduce our emissions significantly in this decade (the national target is half by 2030). This is essential to ensuring Wellington is a place where human society can flourish in future decades and centuries.

The biggest change to our emissions will come when people get onto their feet, bikes or a bus - or into an electric car! Work on the cycleways network, how we design our city, and Let’s Get Wellington Moving’s plans are all part of that change. The full benefits of these won’t occur this decade.

Therefore, in addition to those big pieces of work, we propose to fully fund Council’s climate change action plan, which includes:

  • Converting our vehicle fleet to electric cars
  • Greening our building projects
  • Supporting car sharing and electric vehicle charging
  • Home Energy Saver grants
  • Business Energy Saver grants
  • Wellington Climate Lab
  • Climate and Sustainability Fund

There are three options

Option 1:
Low Level of Funding

Option 2:
Medium Investment with Savings

Option 3:
Fully Fund the programme (preferred)

This is a low funding option that is significantly below what is outlined in the Te Atākura action plan. It will mean a significant reduction in the scope of all planned initiatives.

The difference between this option and Option 2 is a significant reduction in outward facing programmes that support others to take climate action, lower levels of funding for community engagement and initiative development. This level of funding is likely to deliver only half of the reduction in estimated emissions of Option 3.

This is a medium level of funding, below what is outlined in the Te Atākura action plan. The difference between this option and Option 3 is:
  • less funding for the WCC electric vehicle (EV) Fleet
  • public EV chargers; and
  • lower levels of funding for community engagement and initiative development.
Lower levels of reductions in emissions are likely with this option.

This option provides full funding for the Te Atākura action plan (not including Let’s Get Wellington Moving or cycleways).

This means we will be able to work toward reducing our emissions by the full amount planned for this decade. We will also be able to investigate new actions needed and respond to the climate change impacts that we are already seeing in the city.


Capital cost and debt impact: $6.7m (over 10 years)
Same as Option 1
Capital cost and debt impact: $9.1m (over 10 years)
Rates change 0.65% 3 year average increase
Rates change: 0.94% 3 year average increase
Rates change: 1.03% 3 year average increase


These options have pros and cons, which are outlined in more detail here

Our preferred option

The Council prefers Option 3 - to fully fund Te Atakura. This will enable us to work towards reducing our emissions by the full amount planned for this decade.


Want to know more about another Decision? Head back to our Long-term Plan homepage or read our full consultation document

Or, are you ready to have your say? Head to our Long-term Plan online submission form

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Do you have a questions about funding Te Atakura?

Check the FAQ's above on the right of this page as well as other questions below - your question may already have an answer.

Please be concise and respectful in asking questions - we will do our best to respond promptly usually by the next working day). Some answers may take a bit longer to get the details right. We monitor the site from 8:30am - 5pm Monday to Friday

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    Hi- can you please explain what are the "Home Energy Saver grants" and who is eligible? As a renter, I want to see policies in place that encourage my landlord to invest in insulation, double glazing, heat pump, etc. to reduce energy consumption. All the electricity I turn into heat energy just escapes through the gaps in the 'character' house in which I live. It was fine for the original owners who could just throw another log onto a blaze in one of the 3 fireplaces - all of which have long been sealed off--but now I just see an enormous electricity bill when I try to keep the home somewhat comfortable. With so many homes occupied by tenants (not owner-occupiers), something needs to be done to increase energy efficiency of our housing stock.

    daviddepalma asked 6 months ago

    Kia ora daviddelpalma,

    Sorry for the slow response. Here is the answer from Alison, Manager Climate Change Response. 

    Can you please explain what are the "Home Energy Saver grants" and who is eligible?
    These grants are for ratepayers. A landlord can get one for their property. The grant covers the cost of the Sustainability Trust doing an energy efficiency assessment, and providing recommendations for improvements to the property to reduce energy consumption and improve warmth and well-being in the home. 

     As a renter, I want to see policies in place that encourage my landlord to invest in insulation, double glazing, heat pump, etc. to reduce energy consumption.
    The government has put in place the Healthy Home Guarantees Act, which is intended to ensure that landlords are providing warm, dry homes. More information on it is here: https://www.hud.govt.nz/residential-housing/healthy-rental-homes/healthy-homes-standards/about-the-healthy-home-standards/ 

    All the electricity I turn into heat energy just escapes through the gaps in the 'character' house in which I live. It was fine for the original owners who could just throw another log onto a blaze in one of the 3 fireplaces - all of which have long been sealed off--but now I just see an enormous electricity bill when I try to keep the home somewhat comfortable. With so many homes occupied by tenants (not owner-occupiers), something needs to be done to increase energy efficiency of our housing stock.
    I’ve lived in a home like that! It’s definitely horrible. There’s also more information at https://www.tenancy.govt.nz/healthy-homes/ I hope you can have a fruitful discussion with your landlord.

    Warm regards, Alison


    Thank you for your interest in the plan

    Nga mihi

    Amy

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    I live in the CBD, if cars are removed how will I get out of town or get my groceries or take my son to cricket with his heavy gear? I can't take a bike or catch a bus for any of these options. I also have 2 retail businesses in the CBD, some of my customers are older, they can't bike and find public transport challenging. How will they reach us without car access or with limited car parks? Also, many of our customers do multiple stops and the current public transport options don't serve them. How will people get across the city is car access is decreased? Surely there's no plan for a ring road. How will I transfer stock between the stores with no vehicle access? Thanks

    Nicola Cranfield asked 6 months ago

    Kia ora Nicola, 

    Sorry for the delay. The response below is from the Let's Get Wellington Moving team, who are doing the Golden Mile upgrade (lwgm.nz)

    To accommodate future growth in the city, Let’s Get Wellington Moving is working to move more people with fewer vehicles. As part of a multimodal package of investments, LGWM is looking to improve walking, cycling and public transport to and through the central city. Alongside this is ensuring that those who need to use a vehicle still can.

    Regards

    Amy