Future of the Central Library consultation

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
Future of the Central Library Consultation

Latest news - Council decision on future on the Central Library

On Wednesday 28 October 2020 Council debated on whether to strengthen (Option C) or build a new (Option D) Central Library for the city. The Council adopted Option C to remediate the current building to the highest level of resilience.

Council recommended Option C to remediate the building to the highest level, based on information gained from the public consultation process and the progression of the design and engineering work. This built on the information available at the time the Statement of Proposal was published.

The cost of Option D is now similar to Option C. Option C will also deliver the elements which were important to supporters of Option D, such as ability to deliver a future proofed library service, mitigate climate change and improved sustainability.

Council also recommended Option C to be incorporated in the draft Long-Term Plan (LTP) which was adopted on 28 October 2020. This allows the officers to continue working on the design and service level brief, including engaging with stakeholders. The results will be presented to Councillors in March 2021 for approval. This also provides the public another opportunity to consider the project alongside the Council’s financial position and other priorities for our city, including Three Waters and Let’s Get Wellington Moving.”

The LTP consultation will begin in March 2021 and will describe Option C in more detail, alongside updated information for all the other options which were considered.

In June 2021 the Council will consider the consultation results and make the final decision on the project to be included in the final LTP.

You can read the paper (included in the Council meeting agenda) on the Council website. The meeting was also livestreamed on the Council’s YouTube page.

Below you can read the revised reports from the external engineers, architects and quantity surveyors which have been published on the Wellington City Council website. They are also available as links on the right-hand side of this web page.

Note: The changed information in the above reports is shown in red text, and information that is no longer relevant has been struck through.

Background
The Central Library has been our city’s living room and a vital part of our vibrant inner city for decades. The building itself isn’t safe to use. There are several ways to make it safe for people to be in, which also brings new possibilities in using the space. This is our once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to set up the central library to continue to support Wellington's diverse communities for at least the next 50 years.

We developed a Statement of Proposal (SOP) outlining the issues with the building, the practicable options available and the factors they were assessed against .

What options were proposed?
The Statement of Proposal outlined five options for retaining a central library service in Te Ngākau Civic Precinct.

The Statement of Proposal also included options which were discarded, with the reasons why. The public was able to provide their views on these five options, or provide their own ideas, or say if they preferred an option which was not put forward.

Why does the proposal suggest modernising the library?
While the priority is on re-establishing a Central Library, we also are responsible for ensuring the new service can meet the needs of Wellington’s future generations. While providing access to books and other physical and digital collections will continue to be a core service, we can also offer people access new technologies, spaces and services which support life-long learning, connection and community.

How were the five proposed options decided and others discarded?
Each of the options were assessed against a range of factors. They included the building's resilience and safety; how it could support a modern library service over the next 50 or more years; the costs and timeframes; how it connects and enlivens Te Ngākau Civic Precinct and how it may affect the environment.

Why did we close the Central Library?
New guidelines for concrete buildings, which were developed by the engineering community and the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment (MBIE) found the Central Library structure and floor system design posed a high level of potential failure in a significant earthquake, and met 15-20 percent of the National Building Standard. On that basis, the Council’s Chief Executive closed the building to the public on 19 March 2019.

Latest news - Council decision on future on the Central Library

On Wednesday 28 October 2020 Council debated on whether to strengthen (Option C) or build a new (Option D) Central Library for the city. The Council adopted Option C to remediate the current building to the highest level of resilience.

Council recommended Option C to remediate the building to the highest level, based on information gained from the public consultation process and the progression of the design and engineering work. This built on the information available at the time the Statement of Proposal was published.

The cost of Option D is now similar to Option C. Option C will also deliver the elements which were important to supporters of Option D, such as ability to deliver a future proofed library service, mitigate climate change and improved sustainability.

Council also recommended Option C to be incorporated in the draft Long-Term Plan (LTP) which was adopted on 28 October 2020. This allows the officers to continue working on the design and service level brief, including engaging with stakeholders. The results will be presented to Councillors in March 2021 for approval. This also provides the public another opportunity to consider the project alongside the Council’s financial position and other priorities for our city, including Three Waters and Let’s Get Wellington Moving.”

The LTP consultation will begin in March 2021 and will describe Option C in more detail, alongside updated information for all the other options which were considered.

In June 2021 the Council will consider the consultation results and make the final decision on the project to be included in the final LTP.

You can read the paper (included in the Council meeting agenda) on the Council website. The meeting was also livestreamed on the Council’s YouTube page.

Below you can read the revised reports from the external engineers, architects and quantity surveyors which have been published on the Wellington City Council website. They are also available as links on the right-hand side of this web page.

Note: The changed information in the above reports is shown in red text, and information that is no longer relevant has been struck through.

Background
The Central Library has been our city’s living room and a vital part of our vibrant inner city for decades. The building itself isn’t safe to use. There are several ways to make it safe for people to be in, which also brings new possibilities in using the space. This is our once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to set up the central library to continue to support Wellington's diverse communities for at least the next 50 years.

We developed a Statement of Proposal (SOP) outlining the issues with the building, the practicable options available and the factors they were assessed against .

What options were proposed?
The Statement of Proposal outlined five options for retaining a central library service in Te Ngākau Civic Precinct.

The Statement of Proposal also included options which were discarded, with the reasons why. The public was able to provide their views on these five options, or provide their own ideas, or say if they preferred an option which was not put forward.

Why does the proposal suggest modernising the library?
While the priority is on re-establishing a Central Library, we also are responsible for ensuring the new service can meet the needs of Wellington’s future generations. While providing access to books and other physical and digital collections will continue to be a core service, we can also offer people access new technologies, spaces and services which support life-long learning, connection and community.

How were the five proposed options decided and others discarded?
Each of the options were assessed against a range of factors. They included the building's resilience and safety; how it could support a modern library service over the next 50 or more years; the costs and timeframes; how it connects and enlivens Te Ngākau Civic Precinct and how it may affect the environment.

Why did we close the Central Library?
New guidelines for concrete buildings, which were developed by the engineering community and the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment (MBIE) found the Central Library structure and floor system design posed a high level of potential failure in a significant earthquake, and met 15-20 percent of the National Building Standard. On that basis, the Council’s Chief Executive closed the building to the public on 19 March 2019.

  • CLOSED: This consultation has closed. If you have any questions please email centrallibrarysubmission@wcc.govt.nz

    Have your say
    We want to hear your views on the future of central library building.

    You can provide your views on the five options proposed, or provide your own idea, or say if you prefer an option which was not put forward.

    Why we’re collecting this information
    At the moment, we don’t have a functioning Central Library building. We need your help to work out what to do.

    Tell us what you think by 5pm Monday 7 September 2020.

    Privacy statement - what we do with your personal information 
    All submissions (including names and contact details) are provided in their entirety to Council officers for the purpose of analysing feedback. No contact details will be made public or linked to your submission.
    Your personal information will also be used for the administration of the engagement process, including informing of the outcome of the consultation.
    All information collected will be held by Wellington City Council, 113 The Terrace, Wellington, with submitters having the right to access and correct their personal information. You can read our full privacy statement at wellington.govt.nz/your-council/dealing-with-the-council/privacy-statement

    Make a submission
    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link