Planning for Wellington's future

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Every three years we review our Long-term Plan. This sets the direction for the next 10 years, outlines what we will be investing in, how much it may cost and how this will be funded.

From now until 30 June next year, we will be preparing the 2021-31 Long-term Plan and will keep this website up-to-date with our progress and let you know how you can help us shape our city for the future.

What is different this time?

This Long-term Plan, we’ll need to make choices as we can't do it all. This is because our planning is being done at a time when our budget is already tight.

We are also facing some extra demands on the budget, such as:

  • increased infrastructure spend, including on Let's Get Wellington Moving, our three waters network, and to accommodate population growth of 50,000 to 80,000
  • the future of the Central Library and Te Ngākau Civic Square
  • other earthquake strengthening-related investment that is needed
  • implementing our Te Atakura (First to Zero) action plan
  • the impacts of COVID-19 and continuing uncertainty about what the future may hold.

Over the course of this Long-term Plan review, we will need to make some choices about:

  • what is an affordable level of rates for now and for generations to come?
  • whether we are willing to pay more in rates to get the improved city services and infrastructure that we want? And if yes, how much more?
  • how we plan our finances allow for future risks like pandemics and earthquakes?
  • who should pay for the costs of growth? Existing ratepayers or new ratepayers?

What is happening now?

Development of the Long-term Plan began in June and will continue until 30 June next year.

So far we have been working to understand and draft the outcomes and objectives for the plan based on Community Wellbeing. This is because the Government has said that councils are responsible for improving the social, economic, environmental and cultural wellbeing of our communities.

The outcomes and objectives have been drafted from what Council has previously heard from the public across numerous engagements, and will help us make the important decisions we will be faced with this Long-term Plan.

Now we want to hear what you think of these and which ones are important to you in the next 10 years. This information will help form the draft Long-term Plan that will be formally consulted on in March 2021.

Have your say now

Every three years we review our Long-term Plan. This sets the direction for the next 10 years, outlines what we will be investing in, how much it may cost and how this will be funded.

From now until 30 June next year, we will be preparing the 2021-31 Long-term Plan and will keep this website up-to-date with our progress and let you know how you can help us shape our city for the future.

What is different this time?

This Long-term Plan, we’ll need to make choices as we can't do it all. This is because our planning is being done at a time when our budget is already tight.

We are also facing some extra demands on the budget, such as:

  • increased infrastructure spend, including on Let's Get Wellington Moving, our three waters network, and to accommodate population growth of 50,000 to 80,000
  • the future of the Central Library and Te Ngākau Civic Square
  • other earthquake strengthening-related investment that is needed
  • implementing our Te Atakura (First to Zero) action plan
  • the impacts of COVID-19 and continuing uncertainty about what the future may hold.

Over the course of this Long-term Plan review, we will need to make some choices about:

  • what is an affordable level of rates for now and for generations to come?
  • whether we are willing to pay more in rates to get the improved city services and infrastructure that we want? And if yes, how much more?
  • how we plan our finances allow for future risks like pandemics and earthquakes?
  • who should pay for the costs of growth? Existing ratepayers or new ratepayers?

What is happening now?

Development of the Long-term Plan began in June and will continue until 30 June next year.

So far we have been working to understand and draft the outcomes and objectives for the plan based on Community Wellbeing. This is because the Government has said that councils are responsible for improving the social, economic, environmental and cultural wellbeing of our communities.

The outcomes and objectives have been drafted from what Council has previously heard from the public across numerous engagements, and will help us make the important decisions we will be faced with this Long-term Plan.

Now we want to hear what you think of these and which ones are important to you in the next 10 years. This information will help form the draft Long-term Plan that will be formally consulted on in March 2021.

Have your say now

  • What is the Long-Term Plan?

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    29 Oct 2020

    So you have heard we are consulting on our ‘Long-term Plan’ and knew it was something important, but what is it and why do we need you to be involved?

    What is the Long-term Plan and why is it important?

    The LTP is the Council’s 10-year delivery plan that sets out our priorities, our core services and activities and investment projects to help grow Wellington’s economy. Think of the Long-Term Plan as guidance on how we will make Wellington an even better place to live, work, play and visit as we go into the future.

    There are four wellbeing outcomes of our LTP (social, cultural, environmental and economic) that focus on what Wellington will look like over the next 10 years.

    For the Council, the LTP is important because it is a time for us to look more widely ahead to the future and think about what changes need to be made now to build the city we want for the future and for future generations.

    It sets out where we are headed, how we spend our money, and what work we do.

    Importantly, through public consultation, it is the community’s chance to have a say in what these future plans are.

  • Planning based around wellbeing

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    29 Oct 2020

    This year, we have put community wellbeing at the heart of the Long-term plan.

    Community wellbeing is split into four outcomes (social, cultural, environmental and economic) that focus on what Wellington will look like over the next 10 years. The outcomes are linked and work together to ensure we are building a city and future that is for all of us. Each of the four outcomes is explained below.

    Environment: A sustainable, natural eco city. A city where the natural environment is being preserved, biodiversity improved, natural resources are used sustainably, and the city is adapting to climate change – for now and future generations.

    Social: A people friendly, compact, and accessible capital city. An inclusive, liveable and resilient city where people, mana whenua, Maori and communities can learn, are connected, well housed, safe and healthy.

    Cultural: An innovative, inclusive quirky city. Wellington is vibrant, creative city with the energy and opportunity to collaborate, explore identities and openly express, preserve and enjoy their arts, culture and heritage.

    Economic: A dynamic and sustainable economy. The city is attracting and developing creative talent to enterprises across the city, creating jobs through innovation and growth while ensuring what we make is being reused.

  • Where do my rates go?

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    29 Oct 2020
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    Explaining your rates

    We set our rates based on the needs of the community, their demand for services and affordability in rates. Our rates revenue is split between targeted rates and general rates. The Council collected $322.2m (GST exclusive) of rates during 2019/20.

    General rates are paid by all ratepayers and applied to services which benefit the whole community, for example, maintaining parks and walkways, operating our libraries, and renewing our roads and footpaths.

    Targeted rates are paid by a specific group of ratepayers who receive a specific service – for example water, stormwater and wastewater services in rural areas, and business improvement districts (BIDs).

    Whether you rent, own a home or a business in Wellington you’ll be contributing to Council rates either directly or indirectly.

    Your money helps us deliver more than 400 day-to-day services and pay for the borrowings used to fund big capital projects across Wellington.